Having Reflective Discussions in Supervision

This section considers what factors need to be in place to promote reflection in supervision. The tools and resources will help you to try out different ways of structuring reflective discussions in supervision.

Knowledge Briefing – Using the supervision relationship to promote reflection

This knowledge briefing is written specifically for practice supervisors. It includes key messages from research and practice evidence about:How relational approaches to supervision can help practice supervisors to facilitate reflective discussions in one to one and group supervision.Creating a safe environment for supervisees to reflect on their personal and professional responses to practice in supervision.The need for practice supervisors to help social workers seek exceptions, challenge their thinking and consider a wide range of explanations and possibilities in their work with children and families.The importance of practice supervisors working collaboratively with supervisees to jointly review the impact and experience of supervision.

Challenge questions and reflective prompts are included to help you consider how you might use these ideas in your role as practice supervisor.

Supervision preparation tool

This tool can be used by your supervisees in order to reflect on what aspects of their work with children and families it would be useful to discuss in supervision. The tool is taken from the Reflective Supervision: Resource Pack published by Research in Practice in 2017.

Framing the dilemma

This tool can be used prior to supervision to help your supervisees critically explore areas of practice with children and families where they are feeling stuck. You can also use this tool to structure reflective discussion in supervision and, in doing so, explore challenges and dilemmas which your supervisees are experiencing. The tool is taken from the Reflective Supervision: Resource Pack published by Research in Practice in 2017.

Recording template

The tool is taken from the Reflective Supervision: Resource Pack published by Research in Practice in 2017. It provides you with a structured template for recording supervision discussions and decisions.

Safe uncertainty

The concept of safe uncertainty is widely used in systemic practice. This visual tool helps practitioners critically analyse their work with families and explore what factors may be influencing their perceptions of risk (and how much uncertainty we can tolerate).

Using the five anchor assessment principles in supervision

This tool gives you information about five evidence-informed anchor principles developed as part of an ‘Analysis and Critical Thinking in Assessment Change Project’ group (made up of social work managers and practitioners from ten local authorities across the country) working with Research in Practice. Key questions, based on the anchor principles, are provided which you can ask in supervision to ensure that analysis and critical thinking inform an assessment process.

Questions around the supervision cycle

These questions help to focus your supervision discussions around a cycle of story, reflection, analysis and action so that you do not leap too early into looking for solutions in supervision. This tool provides you with a list of example questions for each part of the cycle for you to use in supervision.

Movie icon Using interventive interviewing in supervision

Interventive interviewing is a systemic framework which highlights that the kind of questions we ask shape the conversations we have. This presentation gives you information about four broad categories of questions which are included in this framework.

 

This tool gives you more information about the kinds of questions which you can use in interventive interviewing and suggests ways in which you can use these to facilitate reflective discussions in supervision.

Podcast icon Bells that Ring – a process for systemic group supervision

The Bells that Ring model of systemic group supervision provides a structured way of discussing practice with children and families. It is a model of group supervision which is taught on the PSDP. Different roles are assigned to team members to ensure that there is a rich and varied discussion. This presentation explains how to use the model to facilitate reflective discussions about practice.

 

You can also watch this film clip which shows you the Bells that Ring systemic model of group supervision in action.

 

This accompanying tool ‘Bells that ring: an overview of a systemic model of group supervision’ provides summary information about how to facilitate this model of group supervision with your team.

Intervision model of peer-led group supervision

Intervision is a model of group of peer-led supervision which is taught on the PSDP. It provides a structured way of discussing practice with children and families. One member of the group presents a dilemma or challenge. Other members of the group hypothesise about this dilemma in the hearing of the presenter, who later reflects on learning arising from the discussion. The whole group then reflects on learning.

This tool provides summary information about how to use this model.